Posts Tagged ‘rich flavor’

Where Do You Go For Really Good Coffee

Where Do You Go For Really Good Coffee…

I came across a blog today that I thought was cool – written by a guy raised in Southern California.

He’s asking people where they get really good coffee in Japan…Where Do You Go For Your Cup Of Jo? (Sorry had to remove this link – original reference blog no longer exists)Moreover, having lived in the Pacific Northwest in the US for 8 years before coming to Japan, I’ve become a bit of a coffee snob so I figured, before coming here, that I’d have to learn to live without really good coffee. …

Being raised in northern California, having my first cup of Peets at age 14, then living 9 years in Montana and 15 in Seattle (where I got in to the business of really good coffee); thought there might be some similarities in our appreciation of coffee.

Kinda weird seeing a picture of a great bigStarbucks in Japanthat he describes as possibly the busiest Starbucks location in the world.

And here’s a site that provides all the supplies, instructions and table top equipment needed for roasting small batches of your own really good coffee…

Roast your own coffee at home

Nice idea. This is a neat site. I’m kind of spoiled by the rich flavor of dark roast Melita drip or pungently luscious freshly extracted doppios. Personally I prefer the complexity and flavor profiles of drum roasted blends in small batches.And one of the thing I really like about home roasted coffee is how fresh it is.And this blog shows a map and the picture of a storefront of The Coffee Plant to get really good coffee…

Funny thing is they don’t give an address:Let’s assume it’s great coffee, try really good coffee at Coffee Plant if you can find it.

If you’re in the Portland area, head out to:

Longbottom Coffee in Hillsboro for my very favorite – really smooth – air roasted coffees .You can also check out Michael Baccellieri’s blog here The Coffee Mariner

In Seattle… be sure to find this little place on the south end of Phinney Ridge not to far up the hill from the Fremont district…

Great doppios and excellent roasted – on site – espresso and lattes…Lighthouse Roasters

If you have other suggestions – for great coffee haunts in your town, let us know and we’ll stop in and check them out when we’re in your neck of the woods.That’s it for today.Where Do You Go for Really Good Coffee?

Where Do You Go For Really Good Coffee…

Where Do You Go For Really Good Coffee…

I came across a blog today that I thought was cool – written by a guy raised in Southern California.

He’s asking people where they get really good coffee in Japan…Where Do You Go For Your Cup Of Jo? (Sorry had to remove this link – original reference blog no longer exists)Moreover, having lived in the Pacific Northwest in the US for 8 years before coming to Japan, I’ve become a bit of a coffee snob so I figured, before coming here, that I’d have to learn to live without really good coffee. …

Being raised in northern California, having my first cup of Peets at age 14, then living 9 years in Montana and 15 in Seattle (where I got in to the business of really good coffee); thought there might be some similarities in our appreciation of coffee.

Kinda weird seeing a picture of a great bigStarbucks in Japanthat he describes as possibly the busiest Starbucks location in the world.

And here’s a site that provides all the supplies, instructions and table top equipment needed for roasting small batches of your own really good coffee…

Roast your own coffee at home

Nice idea. This is a neat site. I’m kind of spoiled by the rich flavor of dark roast Melita drip or pungently luscious freshly extracted doppios. Personally I prefer the complexity and flavor profiles of drum roasted blends in small batches.And one of the thing I really like about home roasted coffee is how fresh it is.And this blog shows a map and the picture of a storefront of The Coffee Plant to get really good coffee…

Funny thing is they don’t give an address:Let’s assume it’s great coffee, try really good coffee at Coffee Plant if you can find it.

If you’re in the Portland area, head out to:

Longbottom Coffee in Hillsboro for my very favorite – really smooth – air roasted coffees .You can also check out Michael Baccellieri’s blog here The Coffee Mariner

In Seattle… be sure to find this little place on the south end of Phinney Ridge not to far up the hill from the Fremont district…

Great doppios and excellent roasted – on site – espresso and lattes…Lighthouse Roasters

If you have other suggestions – for great coffee haunts in your town, let us know and we’ll stop in and check them out when we’re in your neck of the woods.That’s it for today.Where Do You Go for Really Good Coffee?

Is Boca Java Really Good Coffee?

Is Boca Java Really Good Coffee?

You tell me.

I’ve been a coffee freak for a lot of years and I have a pretty sophisticated palate.

I’m no Ernesto Illy, Alfred Peet, Mauro Cipolla or Michael Baccellieri, but I know good crema when I taste it and I love good espresso.

I really love it.

With a good bean and a savvy barista behind the counter, I always drink doppios. But I watch the ‘pour’ a few times and listen before I order (in a place where I haven’t been before). And I don’t add a sugar cube the way the Italians do, I add a dash of creme in the center of the 2 shots – and drink it quickly while it’s still hot.

A really good espresso always makes me wish I had a 3 or 4" reach with my tongue so I could lick the entire contents out of the those little ceramic espresso cups – because lots of the good tasting stuff sticks to the cup.

One of  my regular customers – a meat cutter from Sam’s club – used to come in and ask for, "the chewy one" – and I would make it for him just the way I liked it best.

When I had my espresso shop I got so I could indentify several of the varietals in the custom blend that I had roasted by Cafe Appassionato in Seattle. I worked closely to develop the "Morning Shot Blend" with the sales rep from the company, a guy name Dan – who was the epitome of customer service,  courtesy and a fantastic relationship builder – in concert with their roaster. We worked hard tweaking the blend, adding a higher percentage of Zimbabwes for sweetness, a touch more brazils and some Costa Rican and Sumatra for the "dry white" finish of a northern European roast. (There were also Columbian Supremo beans for a rich flavor.)

In retrospect – we were all "green" – but over a year, we came up with a signature blend that was well received by the clinetele.

Why a Northern European roast and not a "full city roast"?

Basically, I wanted to be different and create a signature flavor.

Initially, I was trying to come up with something similar to match my favorite blend in Seattle when I first got there in 1990, Torrefazione’s "Perugia Blend". I loved Perugia and when I started my shop, I called the company at least 4 times to get a sales rep to come out and they never called me back.

Too small potatoes in the beginning, I guess. I held a grudge on that one for a while. As it turned out, Torrefazione (the real brains behind it and the guy who knew how to roast better than anybody else in the that company – Umberto) sold out and the quality took a nose dive soon thereafter.

The other roaster I wanted was Cafe Mauro (which became Cafe D’Arte) but they couldn’t sell to me because my competitor across the street used their coffee – and he was good customer.

Mauro Cipolla has one of the best palates in Seattle, by the way. He is a master at coffee. I know his cousin Gianni pretty well who is also in the business.

So what does this have to do with Boca Java?

I saw a promo they have going this month and thought I would pass it on to you guys and see what you think. I emailed the company when I first connected with them online as a referral agent to see if they would send me some samples of coffee so I could evaluate for myself and write about the products.

They "don’t have samples" for vendors. So I haven’t tried their coffee yet.

They are offering 4 bags of coffee for $8.95 as a promo. I’m not sure what types of coffee they are or if they’re any good or not.

But there are several things going for this company I do like:

  1. The "5 Million Cup Program" for our people in the military in Iraq. That’s a cool thing.
  2. They roast fresh with each order. I like fresh coffee.
  3. Their online communication and customer service is the best I have ever experienced and I do a lot online.

Is there coffee any good?

You tell me. For $8.95 it’s worth a shot to try four coffees.

Here’s my promise to you guys…

Whatever the general consensus is from you readers will determine if I continue as a vendor or not, and I will report accurately what the results are.

And I don’t want a bunch of people slamming these guys without trying the samples first. If it’s good coffee, I’ll sell it, if not, I won’t.

You make the call.

You tell me: Is Boca Java is Really Good Coffee?  or not.

P.S. I got an email back from Chris at Boca Java and he said that each bag (in the promo 4pack) is 8 oz and there are a variety of coffees the customer can choose from. On tha basis, $8.95 to try out 2 lbs of fresh roasted coffee seems like a great offer and a real attempt by the roaster to get people to try the coffee.

It’s fair anyway – and to me – smart marketing.

Is Boca Java Really Good Coffee?

Is Boca Java Really Good Coffee?

You tell me.

I’ve been a coffee freak for a lot of years and I have a pretty sophisticated palate.

I’m no Ernesto Illy, Alfred Peet, Mauro Cipolla or Michael Baccellieri, but I know good crema when I taste it and I love good espresso.

I really love it.

With a good bean and a savvy barista behind the counter, I always drink doppios. But I watch the ‘pour’ a few times and listen before I order (in a place where I haven’t been before). And I don’t add a sugar cube the way the Italians do, I add a dash of creme in the center of the 2 shots – and drink it quickly while it’s still hot.

A really good espresso always makes me wish I had a 3 or 4" reach with my tongue so I could lick the entire contents out of the those little ceramic espresso cups – because lots of the good tasting stuff sticks to the cup.

One of  my regular customers – a meat cutter from Sam’s club – used to come in and ask for, "the chewy one" – and I would make it for him just the way I liked it best.

When I had my espresso shop I got so I could indentify several of the varietals in the custom blend that I had roasted by Cafe Appassionato in Seattle. I worked closely to develop the "Morning Shot Blend" with the sales rep from the company, a guy name Dan – who was the epitome of customer service,  courtesy and a fantastic relationship builder – in concert with their roaster. We worked hard tweaking the blend, adding a higher percentage of Zimbabwes for sweetness, a touch more brazils and some Costa Rican and Sumatra for the "dry white" finish of a northern European roast. (There were also Columbian Supremo beans for a rich flavor.)

In retrospect – we were all "green" – but over a year, we came up with a signature blend that was well received by the clinetele.

Why a Northern European roast and not a "full city roast"?

Basically, I wanted to be different and create a signature flavor.

Initially, I was trying to come up with something similar to match my favorite blend in Seattle when I first got there in 1990, Torrefazione’s "Perugia Blend". I loved Perugia and when I started my shop, I called the company at least 4 times to get a sales rep to come out and they never called me back.

Too small potatoes in the beginning, I guess. I held a grudge on that one for a while. As it turned out, Torrefazione (the real brains behind it and the guy who knew how to roast better than anybody else in the that company – Umberto) sold out and the quality took a nose dive soon thereafter.

The other roaster I wanted was Cafe Mauro (which became Cafe D’Arte) but they couldn’t sell to me because my competitor across the street used their coffee – and he was good customer.

Mauro Cipolla has one of the best palates in Seattle, by the way. He is a master at coffee. I know his cousin Gianni pretty well who is also in the business.

So what does this have to do with Boca Java?

I saw a promo they have going this month and thought I would pass it on to you guys and see what you think. I emailed the company when I first connected with them online as a referral agent to see if they would send me some samples of coffee so I could evaluate for myself and write about the products.

They "don’t have samples" for vendors. So I haven’t tried their coffee yet.

They are offering 4 bags of coffee for $8.95 as a promo. I’m not sure what types of coffee they are or if they’re any good or not.

But there are several things going for this company I do like:

  1. The "5 Million Cup Program" for our people in the military in Iraq. That’s a cool thing.
  2. They roast fresh with each order. I like fresh coffee.
  3. Their online communication and customer service is the best I have ever experienced and I do a lot online.

Is there coffee any good?

You tell me. For $8.95 it’s worth a shot to try four coffees.

Here’s my promise to you guys…

Whatever the general consensus is from you readers will determine if I continue as a vendor or not, and I will report accurately what the results are.

And I don’t want a bunch of people slamming these guys without trying the samples first. If it’s good coffee, I’ll sell it, if not, I won’t.

You make the call.

You tell me: Is Boca Java is Really Good Coffee?  or not.

P.S. I got an email back from Chris at Boca Java and he said that each bag (in the promo 4pack) is 8 oz and there are a variety of coffees the customer can choose from. On tha basis, $8.95 to try out 2 lbs of fresh roasted coffee seems like a great offer and a real attempt by the roaster to get people to try the coffee.

It’s fair anyway – and to me – smart marketing.

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