Posts Tagged ‘cup of joe’

Really Good Coffee at Home

Really Good Coffee at Home

has become a serious issue for many of us who love really good coffee. There is nothing like the convenience of the best neighborhood drive thru coffee on the way to work or relaxing coffee houses for road warriors, and you will never hear me dispute that!

None the less, when I first get up in the morning at 5 or 6 a.m., I do not want to have to get dressed and  leave the comfort of home for a really good coffee. I am also more tuned in to how much I spend on coffee than I was in the past. Can you relate to that?

Having been on an extended search for coffee that I truly enjoy – each and every sip of – one that makes my mouth water – I have settled on whole bean because freshly ground is so much tastier and it smells deliciously divine; filling the olfactory system before you even have the first taste with your tongue!

Sexy coffee…whooo hooo! Exciting, isn’t it?

The coffee I have chosen as very reasonably priced for the deliciously robust flavor profile is:

  • French Roast
  • Whole Bean Arabica – 100%
  • Fair Trade
  • and available at Sam’s Club for (get this! hehehe) $14.98  for 2.5 lbs (price amended 3/13/12 from 12.98 and they keep telling us there is no inflation…)

How does it get any better than that?

I love this coffee! It is REALLY GOOD COFFEE.

Here is how I make and enjoy it:

First, you must boil – NOT microwave – your water. You can use gas, electric stove or an electric plug in tea pot but you must bring the water to a boil.

A tip from a real barista: Fresh filtered or pure alkaline water makes the best tasting cup of coffee. ( I prefer Kangen water for coffee and it is much better tasting!)

Next, you buy the brown paper filters , Melitta #2 or #4,  to put inside a plastic or ceramic  filter (cone) holder.  Bulk filters are a Sam’s Club item in our house.

Hamilton Beach Grinder

Then, you grind the coffee, and though I have tried several grinders. Currently, I use a Hamilton Beach HB Coffee Grinder with capacity to grind enough whole beans for about 2-3 cups depending how strong you like your coffee.

I do not grind ahead much because it defeats the purpose and it is so easy to do. I use two coffee scoops of fresh ground French Roast per cup (my husband uses three). Place the filter setup on a cup.

Then pour your boiling hot water over the coffee into the brown paper filter and plastic filter holder, and wait while it drains into your favorite cup!

Hario Coffee Dripper Melitta Style Cone

Half and half? Sugar? Black?

Whatever your personal preference, this is a remarkably good cup of coffee and you will enjoy it completely. I promise! Every cup will be delicious every single time and will drink less and enjoy more.

The Traveler’s Coffee Companion

Now this is so convenient that if you travel frequently, you can pack it up in its own bag and carry it with you! You will never have to start the day with a lousy cup o’ joe nor will  you  have to drive for an hour to have your first cup when on the road. It is not as convenient as the local Starbucks but I have missed the Starbucks exit many a time and longed for the convenience of my good old home brewed best!

Melitta Style Paper Filters

This system has me rather spoiled and it is worth the little bit of effort. I do not much care for the popular drip method coffee pots out there that sends lukewarm water rushing through over-sized coffee grinds that have been sitting on the shelves for weeks – even when they are vacuum packed! The smell of fresh ground coffee is just as important as the taste and is an essential part of how we enjoy our coffee. The American palate for coffee has become more developed thanks to the efforts of coffee roasters like Peets and Starbucks. We paid for the education with every cup, and thank you!

So head on out to find your favorite coffee and do be so kind as to let me know what you find that works for you. Consider it research,  a project to learn more about your coffee palate.  To think I was once a Folgers girl who had graduated to Dunkin’ Donuts coffee. Now that just tastes bitter to me and I can’t bear to drink it. Oh well, to each his or her own!

Make it a ritual that you enjoy!  You deserve a cup of REALLY GOOD COFFEE!

Where Did Really Good Coffee Come From?

Who is Really Good Coffee dot Com?

Maybe you’re asking yourself:

Who are these guys?

What do they know about coffee anyway?

Maybe they’re just coffee snobs who think they know what’s going on.

Actually, this website is one of those warm and fuzzy projects I’ve had in mind for years because I love really good coffee and have since 1966.

In the 90’s, I was co-owner of a little espresso shop called The Morning Shot for 3.5 years in Seattle. That experience taught me a lot about the specialty coffee business and espresso. We also had an espresso cart at two different locations.

After the sale of the shop, I pioneered Oscar’s syrups and the Cappucine line in the Seattle market as a broker – calling on espresso operators to drive distributor business.

Peets Was a Very Good Business Model

Prior to that, my interest in the specialty coffee business was prompted by a 1988 article in Fortune or Forbes (can’t remember which). As I sat in front of the Peets Coffee (across the street from the Claremont Hotel in Berkeley, California), drinking a cup of Joe from Peets, I read that in 1987 Peets had been the most profitable retail operation in the United States – on a

[ $ / square foot ]  basis. That really got my attention.

In 1990, I began researching the espresso business in earnest and creating a business plan. And believe me, I did my homework. In addition, as a retail owner in the business (and later a broker) I got to know a lot of other operators and vendors in the business – primarily Micro Roasters and independents.

Over the course of thousands of hours on the espresso bar – with diligence as well as trial and error – I figured out how to make really good coffee. But not before chasing a lot of good customers away with bad coffee – first.

There’s a lot that goes into producing a good cup.

Of course the blend and the roaster is where it all starts.

But it’s amazing how many "espresso operators" can take a perfectly good bean and ruin it. This isn’t really a reflection on the people personally – and most of them really want to do a good job – like I did. But the difference is that I stuck with it until I figured it out. Lots of operators just don’t have a clue and the simplest way to verify that statement is to taste their coffee.

Today, I can tell what’s going on in an espresso shop about 2 minutes after I walk in the place.

Trial by Fire

As an espresso bar owner – on the commuter flight path into downtown Seattle during rush hour – I learned how to survive first and then thrive in a highly competitive market. The pinnacle accomplishment of The Morning Shot was being written up with a full page in the Sunday Seattle Times Pacific Magazine by the food critic, John Hinterberger.

BTW, a lot of the accolades go to my co-owner, a classically trained French chef, an incredibly hard worker, an all around fantastic lady and my best friend for 15 years, Lori Taylor. Her culinary expertise, hard work and exceptional customer service skills made the place what is was – day after day.

But I was the coffee guy…

The espresso business, by the way, is a blast. I’ve often said it has all of the best elements of owning a bar without the drunks.

Over the course of 3+ years, 6 days a week, 10-14 hours a day working on the espresso bar, I learned a lot about:

  • people
  • how to make really good coffee
  • how people think about coffee
  • perceived value

My intention is to create a really interesting blog and to inform people in a manner that appeals to the intellect. There are a thousand and one stories that I can tell as I dust off the mental archives and tell my espresso story.

And we’ll be reporting live from around the country (in our travels) about:

  • neat little places we find and
  • things we learn about coffee along the way

We’d love to get your feedback and we’d love to be know it if we make a mistake. My other half, Alexandra – the love of my life – is my co-author. She has risen rapidly from the ranks of a Dunkin Donuts coffee fan to a quasi-virtual coffee snob, in a mere two years (under my tutelage).

Besides that, she can write.

Together, with your feedback and participation, we are going to create a great blog and resource.

Look forward to hearing from you.

And we hope you enjoy your really good coffee today.

Where Did Really Good Coffee Come From?

Who is Really Good Coffee dot Com?

Maybe you’re asking yourself:

Who are these guys?

What do they know about coffee anyway?

Maybe they’re just coffee snobs who think they know what’s going on.

Actually, this website is one of those warm and fuzzy projects I’ve had in mind for years because I love really good coffee and have since 1966.

In the 90’s, I was co-owner of a little espresso shop called The Morning Shot for 3.5 years in Seattle. That experience taught me a lot about the specialty coffee business and espresso. We also had an espresso cart at two different locations.

After the sale of the shop, I pioneered Oscar’s syrups and the Cappucine line in the Seattle market as a broker – calling on espresso operators to drive distributor business.

Peets Was a Very Good Business Model

Prior to that, my interest in the specialty coffee business was prompted by a 1988 article in Fortune or Forbes (can’t remember which). As I sat in front of the Peets Coffee (across the street from the Claremont Hotel in Berkeley, California), drinking a cup of Joe from Peets, I read that in 1987 Peets had been the most profitable retail operation in the United States – on a

[ $ / square foot ]  basis. That really got my attention.

In 1990, I began researching the espresso business in earnest and creating a business plan. And believe me, I did my homework. In addition, as a retail owner in the business (and later a broker) I got to know a lot of other operators and vendors in the business – primarily Micro Roasters and independents.

Over the course of thousands of hours on the espresso bar – with diligence as well as trial and error – I figured out how to make really good coffee. But not before chasing a lot of good customers away with bad coffee – first.

There’s a lot that goes into producing a good cup.

Of course the blend and the roaster is where it all starts.

But it’s amazing how many "espresso operators" can take a perfectly good bean and ruin it. This isn’t really a reflection on the people personally – and most of them really want to do a good job – like I did. But the difference is that I stuck with it until I figured it out. Lots of operators just don’t have a clue and the simplest way to verify that statement is to taste their coffee.

Today, I can tell what’s going on in an espresso shop about 2 minutes after I walk in the place.

Trial by Fire

As an espresso bar owner – on the commuter flight path into downtown Seattle during rush hour – I learned how to survive first and then thrive in a highly competitive market. The pinnacle accomplishment of The Morning Shot was being written up with a full page in the Sunday Seattle Times Pacific Magazine by the food critic, John Hinterberger.

BTW, a lot of the accolades go to my co-owner, a classically trained French chef, an incredibly hard worker, an all around fantastic lady and my best friend for 15 years, Lori Taylor. Her culinary expertise, hard work and exceptional customer service skills made the place what is was – day after day.

But I was the coffee guy…

The espresso business, by the way, is a blast. I’ve often said it has all of the best elements of owning a bar without the drunks.

Over the course of 3+ years, 6 days a week, 10-14 hours a day working on the espresso bar, I learned a lot about:

  • people
  • how to make really good coffee
  • how people think about coffee
  • perceived value

My intention is to create a really interesting blog and to inform people in a manner that appeals to the intellect. There are a thousand and one stories that I can tell as I dust off the mental archives and tell my espresso story.

And we’ll be reporting live from around the country (in our travels) about:

  • neat little places we find and
  • things we learn about coffee along the way

We’d love to get your feedback and we’d love to be know it if we make a mistake. My other half, Alexandra – the love of my life – is my co-author. She has risen rapidly from the ranks of a Dunkin Donuts coffee fan to a quasi-virtual coffee snob, in a mere two years (under my tutelage).

Besides that, she can write.

Together, with your feedback and participation, we are going to create a great blog and resource.

Look forward to hearing from you.

And we hope you enjoy your really good coffee today.

Dunn Bros Is Really Good Coffee

We are coffee lovers and Dunn Bros really is Really Good Coffee.

Incidentally, while on a first time business trip to Kansas City, Kansas, we set about locating a place worthy of our coffee palates and much to our surprise on Metcalf Street aka Hywy. 635, we stumbled upon a sweet and cozy little shop called Dunn Bros

Here is a video of a store opening in Minnesota.

Mind you, in all our travels neither one of us had ever heard of Dunn Brothers Coffee before.  We thought we’d found a rare gem of a coffee shop and it was everything we’d hoped for.  The moment we walked in we knew we were in for a treat. Our eyes lit up as we gave each other a knowing smile. 

You can’t fool coffee connoisseurs.  

The Crema Was Superb and the Aftertaste Sweet and Exceptionally Tasty

The staff was college age and well trained. They were friendly, helpful in answering our questions about the area, and knew how to make a great cup of joe!  My latte was perfect and creamy, and the espresso perfecto. They took pride in telling us that they roast their own coffee beans which  come from all over the world (divine French Roast) and we knew it because the smell was heavenly.  I was ready to move in and set up an office there.

I loved the ambiance and the KC(Overland Park), KS store truly had an inviting one.  The large multisided brick fireplace in the center of the store was surrounded by really comfy, seductively inviting, oversized arm chairs and lots of little tables with newspapers, magazines, etc… They had WIFI which we really  needed  in order to maximize our time there.   We had a few different cups of coffee just to check them out because we love it.  On one of our visits I even ate a sandwich which I never eat in coffee shops because I go there for the coffee but I just didn’t want to leave to go eat lunch.

All the furniture was arranged around the fireplace and I felt as though I were a guest in someone’s home so I really relaxed (short of putting on my jammies and slippers).  There were also plenty of tables and chairs along the large storefront windows so the natural light was excellent for reading. Honestly I didn’t want to leave and we went back several times during that trip in November. 

The crazy thing is that for months we had no idea it was a coffee chain that started in Minnesota.  Recently I found the above video on YouTube and several others too.  There are Dunn Brothers Coffee shops in half a dozen states in the midwest and it seems that the crowd is all ages.  Apparently there is a growing coffeehouse atmosphere among the Dunn Bros stores and the musicians love to play there adding even more desirabilitiy to the coffeehouse reputation.

Great coffee and inviting ambiance combined with lots of acoustic guitar and folksinger talent.  Unbeatable and winning combination. And if you are traveling the country and want a great cup of coffee in the midwest here is a Dunn Bros store locator.

I have become a real devotee of Dunn Bros Coffee and I am looking for a reason to go to any state that has a Dunn Bros Coffeehouse in it. 

Take it from us-Dunn Brothers is Really Good Coffee.

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